cantelope

3 die from Listeria infections in New Mexico. Cases in CO, TX, NE. Linked to cantelope. Reply

SANTA FE, N.M. — Three people in New Mexico have died and six others are ill with Listeria infections that preliminary testing has linked to contaminated cantaloupe, state health officials said Monday.

Colorado has also had a significant increase in Listeria cases, including at least one death, health officials said. Patients in both states had eaten cantaloupe.

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Zozobra 04

Zozobra burning! Reply

 What is Zozobra?  Glad you asked…

Zozobra is a hideous but harmless fifty-foot bogeyman marionette. He is a toothless, empty-headed facade. He has no guts and doesn’t have a leg to stand on. He is full of sound and fury, signifying nothing. He never wins. He moans and groans, rolls his eyes and twists his head. His mouth gapes and chomps. His arms flail about in frustration. Every year we do him in. We string him up and burn him down in ablaze of fireworks. At last, he is gone, taking with him all our troubles for another whole year. Santa Fe celebrates another victory. Viva la Fiesta! - A.W. Denninger

More…

Identity revealed on New Mexico state trooper caught on surveillance having sex on car 1

UPDATE: Saturday, Sept. 3, 2011

Bert Lopez is the officer that has become viral on the internet caught on a surveillance camera having sex on the hood of his woman-friends car… with the woman’s Chihuahua as a witness.  Mr Lopez has been fired.  He has 30 days to appeal.

The infamous scene occurred just outside of Santa Fe NM at the county-owned La Bajada Ranch, which was formerly known as Santa Fe Canyon Ranch.  The camera was installed – apparently without the knowledge of the officer – to capture pictures of vandals.  I am sure those that installed it did not expect to capture what they did.

Bert Lopez was also the “State Police Officer of the Year” in State Police District 1 in 2010.

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UPDATE: Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2011

I reside in Albuquerque NM, and ran into my attorney-friend out of Santa Fe today and chatted about this photo…  According to him, the scuttlebutt is that the dog in the picture – which belongs to the lady in the photo – was running around biting the troopers ankle and may have actually set off the surveillance camera.  Personally, I can believe the story about the dog biting his ankles… but the little tiny Chihuahua setting off the camera and not the car???  But it does add a bit of flavor to the story….

Also, he (my friend) did happen to comment that this officer is a very nice man… which is unusual for my friend to say as he typically is not a fan of our local police force (although this is a state trooper, the Justice Dept is investigating our local ABQ police force for too many police shootings & killings) .  Looks as though Mr Trooper here made a very bad judgment call.  Next time, I advise a hotel room.

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Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2011, original posting:

I am completely speechless… well, sort of….

There are many wonderful officers out there in this country… this world.  But sadly, there are many who do not wear their uniform and carry their badge as they were meant to, and the numbers seem to be increasing.

I wonder if the dog in the picture will be a testifying witness to the event…..

He was placed on administrative leave with pay after surveillance photos appear to show the uniformed trooper engaging in sex with a woman on a car in broad daylight.

The photos did not contain a date stamp, but the sheriff’s office said they were taken two weeks ago from a camera used to record graffiti vandals at an entrance to the spacial Santa Fe Ranch.

State Police will not comment about the pictures or any internal investigation against the officer, saying it is an ongoing personnel matter.

Santa Fe Sheriff Robert A. Garcia said the trooper does not face legal action because even though there may be evidence of a lack of judgment, an actual crime was not committed.

Lack of judgment…………  You think?

photo of state trooper having sex on car

Photo and update on New Mexico state trooper caught on surveillance having sex on car 1

UPDATE: Saturday, Sept. 3, 2011

Bert Lopez is the officer that has become viral on the internet caught on a surveillance camera having sex on the hood of his woman-friends car… with the woman’s Chihuahua as a witness.  Mr Lopez has been fired.  He has 30 days to appeal.

The infamous scene occurred just outside of Santa Fe NM at the county-owned La Bajada Ranch, which was formerly known as Santa Fe Canyon Ranch.  The camera was installed – apparently without the knowledge of the officer – to capture pictures of vandals.  I am sure those that installed it did not expect to capture what they did.

Bert Lopez was also the “State Police Officer of the Year” in State Police District 1 in 2010.
____________________________________

UPDATE: Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2011

I reside in Albuquerque NM, and ran into my attorney-friend out of Santa Fe today and chatted about this photo…  According to him, the scuttlebutt is that the dog in the picture – which belongs to the lady in the photo – was running around biting the troopers ankle and may have actually set off the surveillance camera.  Personally, I can believe the story about the dog biting his ankles… but the little tiny Chihuahua setting off the camera and not the car???  But it does add a bit of flavor to the story….

Also, he (my friend) did happen to comment that this officer is a very nice man… which is unusual for my friend to say as he typically is not a fan of our local police force (although this is a state trooper, the Justice Dept is investigating our local ABQ police force for too many police shootings & killings) .  Looks as though Mr Trooper here made a very bad judgment call.  Next time, I advise a hotel room.

______________________________________

Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2011, original posting:

I am completely speechless… well, sort of….

There are many wonderful officers out there in this country… this world.  But sadly, there are many who do not wear their uniform and carry their badge as they were meant to, and the numbers seem to be increasing.

I wonder if the dog in the picture will be a testifying witness to the event…..

He was placed on administrative leave with pay after surveillance photos appear to show the uniformed trooper engaging in sex with a woman on a car in broad daylight.

The photos did not contain a date stamp, but the sheriff’s office said they were taken two weeks ago from a camera used to record graffiti vandals at an entrance to the spacial Santa Fe Ranch.

State Police will not comment about the pictures or any internal investigation against the officer, saying it is an ongoing personnel matter.

Santa Fe Sheriff Robert A. Garcia said the trooper does not face legal action because even though there may be evidence of a lack of judgment, an actual crime was not committed.

Lack of judgment…………  You think?

Update, new photos on Las Conchas Fire, NM; No firework ban in Albuquerque despite worst drought in history Reply

City will not ban fireworks due to fear of civil lawsuits

Apparently the city of Albuquerque will not ban fireworks due to a fear of possible civil lawsuits. How asinine is this? New Mexico is in the the worst drought in recorded history… and the city is worried about law suits?

How about this… when we lose numerous homes due to a careless firecracker, those homeowners who lost their homes should sue the city for NOT banning fireworks.

Since the city will not ban fireworks (is there money under the table here???)… then here is my personal plea to all… please, wait until next year. Wait until the monsoons have passed, and hopefully rehydrated the state…. then set your fireworks off.

I am not anti-fireworks… I grew up with a family that had annual firework extravaganzas every Fourth in our rural Indiana fields. Love them! But I favor keeping our Bosque, keeping our National Forests, and keeping our homes over fireworks any day.

The fireworks can wait.

Here is my little video pleading no fireworks. The footage of the Bosque here in Albuquerque I took today. Below the video is an update on the Las Conchas Fire, and new photos from Los Alamos National Lab’s photostream on Flickr.

Las Conchas Fire Update
For Immediate Release: June 30, 2011

Date Started: 1 p.m., 6/26/2011
Number of Personnel: Approximately 752 personnel including seven hotshot crews and 14 handcrews.
Location: Approximately 12 miles southwest of Los Alamos off NM 4 at mile marker 35
Fuels: Mixed Conifer, Ponderosa Pine. Fuel moisture is extremely low.
Cause: Unknown – under investigation
Equipment: Four dozers and 28 engines
Size: approximately 92,735 acres
Aircraft: Five helicopters
Percent Contained: 3%
Residences: 13 destroyed and 3 damaged
Commercial Property: 3 damaged
Other structures: 2 destroyed

Source 

Las Conchas Fire Burns More Than 6,000 acres of Santa Clara Pueblo Land – 6/30

Santa Clara Pueblo, NM – The Las Conchas Fire has charred more than 6,000 acres of the watershed of Santa Clara Pueblo and continues to destroy cultural sites, forest resources, plants and animals that the people of Santa Clara depend upon for their livelihood and culture.

“We are devastated to witness the destruction of our precious homeland,” said Governor Dasheno. “From time immemorial to this day our community has been stewards of this land, have fought to regain portions taken from us and have invested millions of dollars in restoring the forest and resources.”

Nevertheless, after two days of extreme fire behavior, the Las Conchas Fire entered Santa Clara Pueblo lands mid-day on June 29. In the last 24 hours the fire has exploded across the western third of the reservation. This includes the area known as “P’opii Khanu,” the headwaters of the creek, which the Pueblo regained in 2000 after 140 years of struggle.

Source

Chopper engages in the battle to save Los Alamos Canyon

Fire scars Pajarito Ski Hill

Fire in the Jemez

Haze over the Jemez

Smoke floats over a canyon

Helicopter recon, Las Conchas Fire

Helicopter recon, Las Conchas Fire

LANL helicopter recon

Skycrane in action

Below:  Las Conchas Fire progression map June 20, 2011

Larger view of above map click here

Update on Las Conchas Fire, Los Alamos NM: Google Earth Active Fire Mapping images Reply


Las Conchas Fire Update – June 28, 2011, 11:30 am
Posted on June 28, 2011 by npsnmfireinfo

Fire Information: 505-428-7735 or 505-216-2685 (Daily from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.)
Website Info: http://www.inciweb.org or http://www.nmfireinfo.com
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/T1SWIMT

Date Started: 1 p.m., 6/26/2011 Number of Personnel: Approximately 315. Resources include two hotshot crews and nine hand crews. An Area Command Team and an additional Type I Incident Management Team have been assigned to the fire.

Location: Approximately 12 miles southwest of Los Alamos off NM 4 at mile marker 35 Fuels: Mixed Conifer, Ponderosa Pine. Fuel moisture is extremely low.
Cause: Unknown – under investigation Equipment: Five dozers and 13 engines
Size: 60,741 acres based on infrared data Aircraft: Seven helicopters
Percent Contained: 0%

 Media should call (505) 428-7739 to coordinate interviews.

 For information regarding evacuations or information regarding the Los Alamos National Laboratory, please call 505-820-1226.

 A public meeting is scheduled for 6 p.m., Wednesday, June 29, at the Madonna Parish Hall in Jemez Springs, off Hwy 4 between mile marker 15 and 16.

Fire Update:

East – Crews are working to protect structures near Bandelier, as well as working to contain the fire along the Frijole Canyon.

West – Crews are building direct lines to prevent fire movement to the west.

Northeast – Crews are working to contain the fire using burnout methods to prevent the fire from spreading north of Pajarito Road and east of Highway 501.

South – North of Cochiti fire progression is being slowed by lighter fuel types. Firefighters are evaluating methods to stop the fire from spreading south.

Current Evacuations:

City of Los Alamos – The acting Los Alamos County Administrator issued an evacuation order for the city of Los Alamos. The Cities of Gold hotel in Pojoaque is offering shelter services for evacuating residents of Los Alamos. Los Alamos evacuees are advised against sheltering in White Rock, although White Rock is not at risk. White Rock is currently under a voluntary evacuation.

Pre-Evacuation Alert

If you live near the fire or near the Forest, you should always be ready for emergencies including evacuations, the three-step process is easy to remember and implement:

• Ready – Take personal responsibility and prepare before the threat of a wildland fire so your home is ready in case of a fire. Create defensible space by clearing brush away from your home. Use fire-resistant landscaping and harden your home with fire-safe construction measures. Assemble emergency supplies and belongings in a safe spot. Plan escapes routes. Make sure all those residing within the home know the plan of action.

• Set – Act immediately. Pack your vehicle with your emergency items. Remember your six P’s: people, personal computers, pets, pills, papers and pictures. Stay aware of the latest news and information on the fire from local media and your local fire department

• Go – Leave early! Follow your personal action plan. Doing so will not only support your safety, but will allow firefighters to best maneuver resources to combat the fire.
Closures

NM 4 is closed at Jemez Falls Campground and at NM 501. NM 502 westbound into Los Alamos is now closed to all motorists. Access is controlled and limited to official traffic until further notification.

Bandelier National Monument: The Bandelier National Monument will be closed indefinitely.

Los Alamos National Labs: The Los Alamos National Laboratory will be closed due to the fire. All laboratory facilities will be closed for all activities, and nonessential employees are directed to remain off site. Employees that are considered nonessential should not report to work unless specifically directed by their line managers. Employees should check local news sources, the LANL Update Hotline (505) 667-6622 and the LANL web page http://www.lanl.gov for updates. All radioactive and hazardous material is appropriately accounted for and protected. LANL staff is coordinating the on-site response and supporting the county and federal fire response.

Safety Message

The wildfire and burnout operations will continue to produce heavy smoke. Residents with respiratory problems in the path of smoke may want to consider relocating temporarily until smoke dissipates. Motorists should exercise caution due to reduced visibility.

(below) Google Earth Active Fire Mapping:  Los Alamos snapshot 062811

(below) Google Earth Active Fire Mapping:  New Mexico snapshot 062811

(below) Geomac.gov

Los Alamos NM evacuated as fire rages near Nuclear labs. Aerial footage. 1

LOS ALAMOS, N.M., June 28 (UPI) — Residents were ordered to evacuate Los Alamos, N.M., as an out-of-control wildfire was at the town’s edge and buffeted the secretive U.S. military nuclear lab.

A Los Alamos National Laboratory spokesman said the blaze, at the facility’s southern boundary, remained a few miles from key structures on the 25,600-acre property.

Nuclear and other hazardous materials were in safe storage deep inside vaults within concrete and steel buildings, Kevin Roark told the Alibi newspaper of Albuquerque.

The lab would not comment on a Concerned Citizens for Nuclear Safety allegation that the wildfire was about 3 miles from a nuclear dumpsite containing tens of thousands of 55-gallon drums of plutonium-contaminated waste.

The anti-nuclear watchdog group’s Web site appeared hacked early Tuesday morning, a United Press International check indicated. Its Facebook page had six messages from people alerting the group of the possible hacking, including a message commenting on the timing of the incident happening “just as the fires started.”

The wildfire, which began Sunday and exceeded 50,000 acres, or 78 square miles, early Tuesday, destroyed at least 30 homes and outbuildings south and west of Los Alamos, fire officials said.

“We don’t have a hard number,” Los Alamos Assistant Fire Chief Mike Thompson told the Albuquerque Journal.

Officials planned a flyover Tuesday morning to assess its scope.

The fire — whose flames and smoke could be seen from Albuquerque, about 80 miles south — caused erosion and runoff, with contaminants threatening the Rio Grande, officials said.

Roark told the Alibi, “There were not appreciable levels of radioactivity in the runoff.”

After the Cerro Grande fire in 2000, which devastated Los Alamos and changed firefighting policies and strategies all across the West, the lab installed structures to prevent heavy runoff, he said.

Some residents evacuating the town were “calm and other people are really frantic,” Sheila Luna told the Santa Fe New Mexican.

“The Conoco gas station ran out of gas last night, and at the next gas station I waited for 15 minutes before I could get the car filled up,” she said. “That part was kind of scary to me.”

Source: UPI

Los Alamos NM evacuated from fires – Labs closed: Boycott fireworks in NM, fires all over the state (photos) 2

Please, everyone in New Mexico… BOYCOTT ALL FIREWORKS THIS YEAR!

Fires are erupting all over the state, no rain in site.

Page on Facebook in support of this boycott (must be logged into FB):  Click here

Los Alamos evacuated as Las Conchas fire grows

A mandatory evacuation for the City of Los Alamos is in effect Monday (June 27) as the Las Conchas wildfire threatens the area.

Eletha Trujillo with the Taos County Office of Emergency Management said the primary health concern for Taos County residents was the smoke from the fire that has settled in the area.

Trujillo said the forecast tonight is for cooler temperatures and calming winds, meaning Taoseños might wake up to especially smoky conditions tomorrow (June 28). She recommended that people with health conditions stay indoors and asked that drivers be especially cautious because of limited visability.

Trujillo said that she did not perceive any risk of radiation in the smoke from Los Alamos. Officials at the labs have insisted that all radioactive materials are safely stored and do not pose a threat. A spokesman from the lab could not immediately be reached for comment.

According to a Monday afternoon incident update on the fire, it had grown to nearly 44,000 acres and was 0 percent contained. The Los Alamos National Labs (LANL) were also closed to nonessential personnel Monday.

According to information from Los Alamos County, the evacuation of three areas was taking place Monday, with the groups being notified by “reverse 911.”

Group one includes Western, Quemazon and Ponderosa; group two includes North Community, Barranca Mesa and North Mesa; and group three includes East of Diamond and the rest of the town. Evacuees were urged not to go to White Rock in case that area is evacuated, as well.

Transportation is available for those who call (505) 661-7433. The Big Rock Santa Claran Event Center was opened as a shelter.

Campgrounds near the fire were evacuated Sunday (June 26).

Las Conchas fire started Sunday afternoon on private land near the Jemez Ranger District in the Santa Fe National Forest, about 3 miles south of Los Alamos. Structures and power lines were threatened, but according to the incident update, “all radioactive material is appropriately accounted for and protected.”

For more information and updates, call (505) 667-6622 or visit www.lanl.gov

Source: Taos News

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Below:  Los Alamos, Los Conchas Fire

Below:  Jemez Mountains, recently taken

Below:  South of Belen, taken Sunday, June 26, 2011

Pacheco Fire Time-lapse – 18 June 2011 Reply

Footage by “Tewa.” Footage taken from Santa Clara Pueblo area using a Samsung HMX-U20 video camera. Time-lapse at 1 frame per second and played at 30 frames per second. Video runs for several minutes, this is a short 24 second segment of the mid-afternoon fire as it developed.

Pacheco Canyon fire near Santa Fe NM. Photos. Reply

Apparently, Monday’s winds – which were gusting over 40 mph – actually assisted the forest fire near Santa Fe NM. The winds blew back in the direction of land that was already burned, thus aiding in lowering the spread to fresh forest land.

At noon Tuesday, June 21st (today) incident commanders said the fire had grown to 4,883 acres since it ignited below Ski Santa Fe Saturday and spready into the Pecos Wilderness.  It is zero percent contained.

With the winds dropping today, over the Pacheco Fire, fire behavior was low. A large smoke plume like that observed Sunday will not occur today.

Below are photos taken of the large smoke cloud taken on Sunday, June 19th.  Also included are photos of a helicopter getting water from Nambe Lake for the Pacheco Canyon fire.

Carlsbad Caverns fire over 30,000 acres now, 25% contained. Photos. Reply

A 30,500-acre wildfire sparked Monday afternoon, forcing the evacuation and closure of Carlsbad Caverns National Park.

Twenty-two structures, including the visitors’ center, are threatened. Park housing and White City, N.M., are also threatened at this time.

What started as a 40-acres fire had grown to 25,000 in less than 24 hours as officials said 35-mph winds continue to fuel the wildfire.

The Caverns are currently closed and will not open until the fires have been contained.  The cause of the fire is not yet known.

Arizona’s Wallow Fire over 100,000+ acres strong, and thick smoke choking out New Mexico Reply

JUNE 06, 2011 UPDATE:

I live in Albuquerque NM, and the city is completely covered with the thick smoke from these AZ fires.  See my posting and footage taken tonight of the smoky skies overhead.  When watching, remember, today was a completely clear, sunny day.  Not a cloud in the sky.

Posting:  Albuquerque NM completely engulfed in smoke from the massive AZ fires

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Arizona’s Wallow Fire began on May 29th, and is believed to have been sparked by an unattended campfire. The fire is named after Bear Wallow Wilderness in the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest which is near where the fire originated. It is now one of the largest fires in Arizona history. More…