Activism, Protests & Rights

TIME 2011 Person of the Year: The Protester

Mannoubia Bouazizi, the mother of Tunisian street vendor Mohamed Bouazizi, says, "Mohamed suffered a lot. He worked hard. But when he set fire to himself, it wasn’t about his scales being confiscated. It was about his dignity."

The decision has been made.  The Protester is TIME Magazines Person of the Year, and what a wonderful choice.

The Protester is not dreaming of nor coveting millions of dollars, nor titles such as President, Ruler, King, Queen, Sheik, etc.  All The Protester is wanting is a fair shake at life.  The ability and opportunity to find gainful employment, take care of their family, keep a roof over their head and food on their table, the ability for quality health care, reasonable tuition for a higher education… these are only a few of the many desires the average citizen of all countries want, including our own.

And this year, they spoke and will continue to speak until change is made for the betterment and fairness for all.

From TIME Magazine:

History often emerges only in retrospect. Events become significant only when looked back on. No one could have known that when a Tunisian fruit vendor set himself on fire in a public square in a town barely on a map, he would spark protests that would bring down dictators in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya and rattle regimes in Syria, Yemen and Bahrain. Or that that spirit of dissent would spur Mexicans to rise up against the terror of drug cartels, Greeks to march against unaccountable leaders, Americans to occupy public spaces to protest income inequality, and Russians to marshal themselves against a corrupt autocracy.Protests have now occurred in countries whose populations total at least 3 billion people, and the word protest has appeared in newspapers and online exponentially more this past year than at any other time in history.

Is there a global tipping point for frustration? Everywhere, it seems, people said they’d had enough. They dissented; they demanded; they did not despair, even when the answers came back in a cloud of tear gas or a hail of bullets. They literally embodied the idea that individual action can bring collective, colossal change. And although it was understood differently in different places, the idea of democracy was present in every gathering. The root of the word democracy is demos, “the people,” and the meaning of democracy is “the people rule.” And they did, if not at the ballot box, then in the streets. America is a nation conceived in protest, and protest is in some ways the source code for democracy — and evidence of the lack of it.

The protests have marked the rise of a new generation. In Egypt 60% of the population is under the age of 25. Technology mattered, but this was not a technological revolution. Social networks did not cause these movements, but they kept them alive and connected. Technology allowed us to watch, and it spread the virus of protest, but this was not a wired revolution; it was a human one, of hearts and minds, the oldest technology of all.

Everywhere this year, people have complained about the failure of traditional leadership and the fecklessness of institutions. Politicians cannot look beyond the next election, and they refuse to make hard choices. That’s one reason we did not select an individual this year. But leadership has come from the bottom of the pyramid, not the top. For capturing and highlighting a global sense of restless promise, for upending governments and conventional wisdom, for combining the oldest of techniques with the newest of technologies to shine a light on human dignity and, finally, for steering the planet on a more democratic though sometimes more dangerous path for the 21st century, the Protester is TIME’s 2011 Person of the Year.

Some photos from TIME 2011 Person of the Year: The Protester – followed by TIME videos.

Click on a thumbnail to bring up the image in full size and resolution in the shadowbox.
You may then toggle through each picture at your own pace.
All photos by Peter Hapak for TIME.

______________________

TIME Person of the Year 2011: The Protester


______________________

Why TIME Chose “The Protester” as Person of the Year 2011


______________________

Why They Protest: Tunisia, Yemen & Bahrain


______________________

Why They Protest: Egypt, Syria & Libya


______________________

Why They Protest: USA

Advertisements

4 replies »

Go ahead... I can hear your thoughts. Please share with the rest!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s